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Despite the Pandemic, I still plan to run Skrivarakademin’s Creative Writing and Narrative Theory course this spring, with the first meeting delayed until Thursday, February 25th. Classes are scheduled on-location at Folkuniversitetet, Kungstensgatan 45 in Stockholm (nearest train stop is Odenplan, nearest subway stop is Rådmansgatan), with an online option available for those who wish to participate via video-link from home.

As with the two previous terms, I’ll be offering in-person and online participants. We have engaged groups and attendance is always very high. The last few years, spots have been very hard to get, but due to the Pandemic there are at the moment a few left.

The course meets for ten weeks, and covers basic elements of narrative writing, from punctuation and syntax to story mechanics. We also work with theory, and study professional examples. Many students report gaining both skills and self-confidence, and that they learn better self-discipline and editing skills. We also have a lot of fun together.

And good news: some participants from the fall 2020 class are currently writing a story cycle together with some of my other students. The paperback book is scheduled to be printed and released this May. Watch this space for more news about the project. And please contact me at kevin.frato@folkuniversitetet.se if you have any questions.

Looking forward to working with you this spring.

Natur och Kultur Publishers passed out this flyer during the Skolforum conference in Stockholm in October, where I lectured on teaching creative writing in the classroom.

The book is slated to be released spring 2019.

Creative Writing_infoblad

English teachers directly affect the future of our society, and one of the most important ways is through teaching young people to mature (which in turn helps society mature) through reading and writing stories. Many English teachers already teach creative writing; others would like to but are afraid, or don’t know how, or don’t think they’re allowed.

In order to help all these teachers, this winter I’ll be releasing a new book through Swedish publishers Natur och Kultur called Creative Writing – A Classroom Guide, which instructs teachers about why and how to teach writing in the classroom.

There are many benefits of working with creative writing compared to academic formats.  Essays and reports are incredibly important to society, but they work at the conscious level, and tend to age quickly; narrative fiction, theater, and poetry on the other hand work at the subconscious level, and become a lasting part of our personal and cultural identities.

Creative Writing – A Classroom Guide is the result of decades of leading writing workshops and teaching writing to all ages in the USA, Sweden and Italy.  It includes theory, practical help, concrete skills-based exercises, and new ways of working including a how-to for making books of interwoven short stories (story cycles) with English classes.

Look for it in early 2019.

 

PS: I’ve been travelling Sweden recently running workshops on this subject, sponsored by my publishers Natur och Kultur.  My latest workshop was at Vägga Gymnassieskola in Karlshamn – teacher Jeanette Ekwurtzel wrote about my visit here.

PPS: I’ll also be lecturing on this topic at Skolforum, Stockholm on the 29th of October, 2018.

On February 6th, 2018 I’ll be speaking at a Skolporten conference for English teachers at Näringslivets Hus in Stockholm.

My focus will be on non-traditional, more practical and enjoyable ways of teaching writing, which has also been the focus of my workshops for teachers through Natur och Kultur Publishers.  I’ll also be mentioning my upcoming book with Natur och Kultur The Creative Writing Classroom Guide, which will hopefully be released in the fall of 2018.

Due to its structural and linguistic complexity, creative writing is far more complex and demanding than non-fiction –– though unfortunately many teachers think this makes it both impossible and irresponsible to work with.  The truth is, though, that learning to write fiction is even more important than learning to write essays.  Through writing creatively, we lay the foundation for the future, not just mirroring the world but re-inventing it –– even though it may take generations for the world to catch up.

Hope to see you at Skolporten on the 6th of February.

I’ll be finishing my Swedish lecture tour on Wednesday, May 10th at the Natur och Kultur building in Stockholm, talking about teaching creative writing at the high school level. The lecture starts at 5 p.m. (refreshments from 4 p.m.) and the sign up is here.

I’ll be discussing the benefits and challenges of using creative writing in the English curriculum, how to grade creative writing and the workshopping process, teaching the theory of what creative writing is, teaching narrative structure and mechanics, and finally describing the workshopping format and its dos and don’ts (extremely important for protecting students’ integrity, and where my Echo Main Issues books differ from others).

I’m planning to cover a lot of useful material during the evening.  Please bring your ideas and questions, and I hope to see you there!

There are still a few spots available in my two spring 2017 writing courses at Skrivarakademin in Stockholm.

Creative Writing and Narrative Theory, the entry-level course, runs on Mondays starting February 6th.  In this course I teach linguistic style, narrative mechanics, and simple narrative structures.

The Novel Workshop, for people working on longer projects, runs every other Thursday starting on February 9th.  This course works more in-depth with longer manuscripts, their structural strategies, linguistic elements, their psychology, etc.

Hope to see you there!

 

For this year’s short story workshop at Skrivarakademin, I’ll be placing a special emphasis on finding and adapting stories for short literary formats.  How do you quickly and convincingly transport the reader into the world of the story?  How can we quickly create a connection between readers and characters?  What common story structures sell well, and why?  And what effects do various stylistic tools have on the story?

I’m shifting the date of the workshop back one weekend from the advertised date.  If you have any questions, please contact me here.

 

This is my schedule for free lectures for teachers at Swedish schools ––  the topics are teaching the writing process through conversation theory, and how to work with creative writing in the classroom.  All workshops generously sponsored by Natur och Kultur publishers, Stockholm.  The schools listed are the ones who have signed up, and who we’ve been able to fit into my schedule (I teach at two different schools and can’t be away all the time).   I’m aware that some schools have requested a time but not yet received one.

If your school is not signed up but is still interested, please contact gunilla.hallin@nok.se. It might still be possible to find a time, but unfortunately there are no guarantees.

I look forward to working with you!

June

– Söderköping: Nyströmska gymnasium, June 8th

September

– Nässjö, Brinellgymnasiet: Sept. 5th

– Halmstad: Sturegymnasiet & Sannarpsgymnasiet, Sept. 21st

October

– Gothenburg: Göteborgs Folkhögskola & Schillerska Gymnasium, Oct. 4th

– Stockholm: Cybergymnasiet, October 6th

– Lidingö: Hersby gymnasium

– Stockholm: Fryshuset, Oct. 17th (preliminary)

– Mora: Mora Gymnasium, October 26th

November

– Stockholm: Thorildsplans gymnasium, Nov. 15th

 

My publisher Natur och Kultur has booked me in to lecture at Swedish schools this year, and first up is Nyströmska skolan in Söderköping, where I’ll be discussing teaching the writing process based on conversation theory.  This is a method I developed a few years ago after years –– decades –– of trying to find a better way to teach academic writing, and in general a more unified theory for helping students understand the writing process.  I’d recently completed double a masters in education and English at the University of Stockholm, and had taken a course in linguistics that got me thinking about language and communication in new ways.

At the same time, I was teaching one group of students how to make speeches based on conversation theory, and another how to write.  I finally put the two together and realized I was teaching the same process, but calling it two different things.  A colleague was sick and I was asked to tae his English classes on short notice, so in desperation, not knowing what he’d already taught his students, I decided to teach them something I knew they wouldn’t have heard before ––– and I taught my first lesson on teaching essay writing based on the universal rules of structuring a conversation.

Since then I’ve refined the method, and I’ve found it helps students accept and understand various writing conventions much more easily –– because suddenly they learn that structuring our ideas on paper is the same as structuring arguments with our parents.  I used to introduce academic writing (logical structures) by saying, “This is boring but I unfortunately I have to teach you anyway.”  Nowadays I introduce it by saying, “Today I’m going to teach you how to win arguments with your parents.”

That usually gets their attention.

The method I developed is outlined in the back of my book Echo 6 Main Issues (fiction and instructional texts for high school students).

At my lectures this year, I’ll also be discussing why and how to teach creative writing in the classroom, as well as discussing simple guidelines for workshopping writing with students.  If you’ve booked me for a lecture, I’m looking forward to working with you.  If you still want to book me for a lecture, contact Natur och Kultur here.

In recent weeks two people have asked me which course they should sign up for at Skrivarakademin –– Creative Writing and Narrative Theory, or the Novel Workshop.

Both courses are helpful, but in different ways.  I designed these course to save people years of confused, lonely struggle developing linguistic and narrative skills, to give writers the kind of understanding of their own writing that it took me two decades of writing, workshopping, studying, rejection, and publishing to acquire.  Honestly, all of us start out as struggling writers, but some of us struggle more than others.

When thinking about which course to take, think about your goals as a writer.  If you’re interested in developing as a writer, by all means start with the intro course Creative Writing and Narrative Theory, which systematically deals with skills and theories to help you build your style from the ground up.

On the other hand, if you’re in the middle of the manuscript that is giving you a mid-life crisis and breaking apart your relationship –– or keeping you from having one –– and just want help making sense of this project and getting it drafted (and you already have a solid set of intuited linguistic and narrative skills)… then the novel workshop is probably the right place for you.  It’s possible you’ll go back afterwards and tak the intro course; every once in a while people do just that.  But for now you’ll enjoy being with people involved in the same situation as you.  By the way, what if you’re attempting a complex novel that deals with serious historical topics over a long period of time, and you feel you’re in over your head?  Congratulations.  As Italo Calvino wrote in Six Memos for the Next Millenium, ambitious projects are what the novel format is for –– trying to encompass the complexities of life and attempting things that border on the impossible.  That’s how writers, readers and the novel itself as a format develop.

Of course there’s also the weekend Short Story Workshop in May, for those interested in learning short formats for sellable stories (with guest poet Moira Egan this time, who was extremely popular two years ago when she came to Skrivarakademin to tach for a day).